The extracellular matrix protein mindin is a pattern-recognition molecule for microbial pathogens

You Wen He, Hong Li, Jun Zhang, Chia Lin Hsu, Emily Lin, Nu Zhang, Jian Guo, Katherine A. Forbush, Michael J. Bevan

Resultado de la investigación: Articlerevisión exhaustiva

137 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Microbial pathogens use a variety of their surface molecules to bind to host extracellular matrix (ECM) components to establish an effective infection. However, ECM components can also serve as an integral part of the innate immunity. Mice lacking expression of mindin (spondin 2), a highly conserved ECM protein, have an impaired ability to clear bacterial infection, and mindin-deficient macrophages show defective responses to a broad spectrum of microbial stimuli. Moreover, mindin binds directly to bacteria and their components and functions as an opsonin for macrophage phagocytosis of bacteria. Thus, mindin is essential in the initiation of the innate immune response and represents a unique pattern-recognition molecule in the ECM for microbial pathogens.

Idioma originalEnglish (US)
Páginas (desde-hasta)88-97
Número de páginas10
PublicaciónNature Immunology
Volumen5
N.º1
DOI
EstadoPublished - ene. 2004
Publicado de forma externa

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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