Plasma Metabolomics of Dietary Intake of Protein-Rich Foods and Kidney Disease Progression in Children

Chronic Kidney Disease Biomarkers Consortium

Producción científica: Articlerevisión exhaustiva

1 Cita (Scopus)

Resumen

Objective: Evidence regarding the efficacy of a low-protein diet for patients with CKD is inconsistent and recommending a low-protein diet for pediatric patients is controversial. There is also a lack of objective biomarkers of dietary intake. The purpose of this study was to identify plasma metabolites associated with dietary intake of protein and to assess whether protein-related metabolites are associated with CKD progression. Methods: Nontargeted metabolomics was conducted in plasma samples from 484 Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) participants. Multivariable linear regression estimated the cross-sectional association between 949 known, nondrug metabolites and dietary intake of total protein, animal protein, plant protein, chicken, dairy, nuts and beans, red and processed meat, fish, and eggs, adjusting for demographic, clinical, and dietary covariates. Cox proportional hazards models assessed the prospective association between protein-related metabolites and CKD progression defined as the initiation of kidney replacement therapy or 50% eGFR reduction, adjusting for demographic and clinical covariates. Results: One hundred and twenty-seven (26%) children experienced CKD progression during 5 years of follow-up. Sixty metabolites were significantly associated with dietary protein intake. Among the 60 metabolites, 10 metabolites were significantly associated with CKD progression (animal protein: n = 1, dairy: n = 7, red and processed meat: n = 2, nuts and beans: n = 1), including one amino acid, one cofactor and vitamin, 4 lipids, 2 nucleotides, one peptide, and one xenobiotic. 1-(1-enyl-palmitoyl)-2-oleoyl-glycerophosphoethanolamine (GPE, P-16:0/18:1) was positively associated with dietary intake of red and processed meat, and a doubling of its abundance was associated with 88% higher risk of CKD progression. 3-ureidopropionate was inversely associated with dietary intake of red and processed meat, and a doubling of its abundance was associated with 48% lower risk of CKD progression. Conclusions: Untargeted plasma metabolomic profiling revealed metabolites associated with dietary intake of protein and CKD progression in a pediatric population.

Idioma originalEnglish (US)
Páginas (desde-hasta)95-104
Número de páginas10
PublicaciónJournal of Renal Nutrition
Volumen34
N.º2
DOI
EstadoPublished - mar 2024
Publicado de forma externa

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

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