Nestmate recognition in Camponotus floridanus callow worker ants: are sisters or nestmates recognized?

Laurence Morel, Murray S. Blum

Producción científica: Articlerevisión exhaustiva

27 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Callow workers of the Florida carpenter ant, Camponotus floridanus Buckley, reared with their sisters displayed more aggressive acts towards unrelated unfamiliar foragers than towards related unfamiliar foragers. When callows were reared with foreign nurses they were more aggressive towards their own unfamiliar sisters than towards the unfamiliar sisters of their nurses. Thus callow workers recognized the sisters of the workers they were reared with as nestmates. This ability was not dependent on whether or not callows received cues from older ants during their emergence. Similarly, a forager was less aggressive towards unfamiliar callows reared with its sisters than towards those reared with nurses unrelated to itself. In addition, foragers were less aggressive towards their callow sisters than towards unrelated callows, regardless of the relatedness between the foragers and the rearing nurses.

Idioma originalEnglish (US)
Páginas (desde-hasta)718-725
Número de páginas8
PublicaciónAnimal Behaviour
Volumen36
N.º3
DOI
EstadoPublished - jun 1988
Publicado de forma externa

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Animal Science and Zoology

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