Community-based diagnosis of non-communicable diseases and their risk factors in rural and urban Haiti: A cross-sectional prevalence study

Vincent Degennaro, Stuart Malcolm, Lindsay Crompton, Krishna Vaddiparti, Lazarus K. Mramba, Catherine Striley, Linda Cottler, Kellee Taylor, Robert Leverence

Producción científica: Articlerevisión exhaustiva

15 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Objective To estimate the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes and chronic kidney disease and their risk factors in a rural and urban region of Haiti. Setting and participants Community health workers enumerated 2648 households (909 rural and 1739 urban) via a multistage cluster random sampling method from July 2015 to May 2016, completed 705 rural and 1419 urban assessments for adults aged 25-65 years. Outcome measures We performed a WHO STEPS based questionnaire, measured two blood pressure values, weight, height, abdominal circumference and point of care test finger stick blood sample for haemoglobin A1c, creatinine and cholesterol (total, high density lipoprotein (HDL) and triglycerides). Results After adjusting for age and sex, the overall prevalence rates of hypertension, diabetes and chronic kidney disease were 15.6% (±2.93%), 19.7% (±1.57%) and 12.3% (±2.72%), respectively. Of the three non-communicable diseases (NCDs), only diabetes showed a significant difference between rural and urban sites (p=0.000), with the rural site (23.1%) having a higher prevalence than the urban site (16.4%). When comparing male and female participants, females were significantly more likely than males to have an NCD (p≤0.011). Females had a higher prevalence of most of the risk factors when compared with males. The urban location had a higher prevalence than the rural location for four risk factors that showed a significant difference between location (p≤0.037). Conclusions Women in Haiti had significantly higher prevalence rates of most NCDs and risk factors than men, and urban populations frequently, but not always, had higher rates of NCDs risk factors than the rural population. Further, it was shown that using point of care blood tests combined with community health workers, it is feasible to screen for NCDs and risk factors in remote areas which otherwise have limited access to healthcare.

Idioma originalEnglish (US)
Número de artículoe020317
PublicaciónBMJ Open
Volumen8
N.º4
DOI
EstadoPublished - abr 1 2018
Publicado de forma externa

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine

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