Yellow fever 17D-vectored vaccines expressing Lassa virus GP1 and GP2 glycoproteins provide protection against fatal disease in guinea pigs

Xiaohong Jiang, Tim J. Dalebout, Peter J. Bredenbeek, Ricardo Carrion, Kathleen Brasky, Jean Patterson, Marco Goicochea, Joseph Bryant, Maria S. Salvato, Igor S. Lukashevich

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    42 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    Yellow Fever (YF) and Lassa Fever (LF) are two prevalent hemorrhagic fevers co-circulating in West Africa and responsible for thousands of deaths annually. The YF vaccine 17D has been used as a vector for the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (LASV-GPC) or their subunits, GP1 (attachment glycoprotein) and GP2 (fusion glycoprotein). Cloning shorter inserts, LASV-GP1 and -GP2, between YF17D E and NS1 genes enhanced genetic stability of recombinant viruses, YF17D/LASV-GP1 and -GP2, in comparison with YF17D/LASV-GPC recombinant. The recombinant viruses were replication competent and properly processed YF proteins and LASV GP antigens in infected cells. YF17D/LASV-GP1 and -GP2 induced specific CD8+ T cell responses in mice and protected strain 13 guinea pigs against fatal LF. Unlike immunization with live attenuated reassortant vaccine ML29, immunization with YF17D/LASV-GP1 and -GP2 did not provide sterilizing immunity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of YF17D-based vaccine to control LF in West Africa.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1248-1257
    Number of pages10
    JournalVaccine
    Volume29
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Feb 1 2011

    Keywords

    • Lassa Fever
    • Recombinant vaccines
    • YF17D vaccine
    • Yellow Fever

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Molecular Medicine
    • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
    • veterinary(all)
    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
    • Infectious Diseases

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