White oral lesions, actinic cheilitis, and leukoplakia: confusions in terminology and definition: Facts and controversies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Many diseases affecting the cutaneous tissues may incur observable changes to the mucosal tissues of the oral cavity. As a consequence, the dermatologist should always assess the oral mucosal tissues of their patients as a matter of routine. Equivocal lesions should be referred to a dentist for further assessment. Although most encountered white oral lesions are innocuous, some potentially serious conditions may mimic an innocuous white lesion. As examples, oral lichen planus may cause significant patient discomfort and is associated with some degree of increased malignant risk, whereas actinic cheilitis and leukoplakia have a confirmed association with an increased malignant risk. This contribution reviews the characteristics and management strategies for some of the more common white oral lesions that the dermatologist may observe in clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)262-268
Number of pages7
JournalClinics in Dermatology
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

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