When melatonin gets on your nerves: Its beneficial actions in experimental models of stroke

Russel J Reiter, Dun Xian Tan, Josefa Leon, Ülkan Kilic, Ertugrul Kilic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

138 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article summarizes the evidence that endogenously produced and exogenously administered melatonin reduces the degree of tissue damage and limits the biobehavioral deficits associated with experimental models of ischemia/reperfusion injury in the brain (i.e., stroke). Melatonin's efficacy in curtailing neural damage under conditions of transitory interruption of the blood supply to the brain has been documented in models of both focal and global ischemia. In these studies many indices have been shown to be improved as a consequence of melatonin treatment. For example, when given at the time of ischemia or reperfusion onset, melatonin reduces neurophysiological deficits, infarct volume, the degree of neural edema, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyls, DNA damage, neuron and glial loss, and death of the animals. Melatonin's protective actions against these adverse changes are believed to stem from its direct free radical scavenging and indirect antioxidant activities, possibly from its ability to limit free radical generation at the mitochondrial level and because of yet-undefined functions. Considering its high efficacy in overcoming much of the damage associated with ischemia/reperfusion injury, not only in the brain but in other organs as well, its use in clinical trials for the purpose of improving stroke outcome should be seriously considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-117
Number of pages14
JournalExperimental Biology and Medicine
Volume230
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 2005

Fingerprint

Melatonin
Theoretical Models
Stroke
Brain
Reperfusion Injury
Free Radicals
Ischemia
Scavenging
Neuroglia
Lipid Peroxidation
DNA Damage
Neurons
Reperfusion
Edema
Animals
Blood
Antioxidants
Clinical Trials
Tissue
Lipids

Keywords

  • Antioxidant
  • Brain oxidative stress
  • Free radicals
  • Ischemia/reperfusion injury
  • Melatonin
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

When melatonin gets on your nerves : Its beneficial actions in experimental models of stroke. / Reiter, Russel J; Tan, Dun Xian; Leon, Josefa; Kilic, Ülkan; Kilic, Ertugrul.

In: Experimental Biology and Medicine, Vol. 230, No. 2, 02.2005, p. 104-117.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reiter, Russel J ; Tan, Dun Xian ; Leon, Josefa ; Kilic, Ülkan ; Kilic, Ertugrul. / When melatonin gets on your nerves : Its beneficial actions in experimental models of stroke. In: Experimental Biology and Medicine. 2005 ; Vol. 230, No. 2. pp. 104-117.
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