Vulnerable adolescent mothers' perceptions of maternal role and HIV risk

Janna Lesser, Rachel Oakes, Deborah Koniak-Griffin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pregnant adolescents and young mothers living in Los Angeles County are vulnerable to acquiring HIV/AIDS through sexual transmission because they lack the resources, social status, and power to protect themselves. In this article we describe adolescent mothers' (n = 76) responses to an HIV prevention program. The design of the study was based in ethnography, the anthropological tradition of qualitative research. Many of the pregnant teens and young mothers described how the experience of becoming a mother helped empower them to improve their lives. Yet efforts to decrease risky sexual behavior were overshadowed by more immediate concerns and by relationship issues of gender and power and of trust.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)513-528
Number of pages16
JournalHealth Care for Women International
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mothers
HIV
Cultural Anthropology
Anthropology
Los Angeles
Qualitative Research
Interpersonal Relations
Sexual Behavior
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Power (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Vulnerable adolescent mothers' perceptions of maternal role and HIV risk. / Lesser, Janna; Oakes, Rachel; Koniak-Griffin, Deborah.

In: Health Care for Women International, Vol. 24, No. 6, 07.2003, p. 513-528.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lesser, Janna ; Oakes, Rachel ; Koniak-Griffin, Deborah. / Vulnerable adolescent mothers' perceptions of maternal role and HIV risk. In: Health Care for Women International. 2003 ; Vol. 24, No. 6. pp. 513-528.
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