Violence victimization after HIV infection in a US probability sample of adult patients in primary care

Sally Zierler, William E. Cunningham, Ron Andersen, Martin F. Shapiro, Sam A. Bozzette, Terry Nakazono, Sally Morton, Stephen Crystal, Michael Stein, Barbara Turner, Patti St. Clair

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145 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. This study estimated the proportion of HIV-infected adults who have been assaulted by a partner or someone important to them since their HIV diagnosis and the extent to which they reported HIV-seropositive status as a cause of the violence. Methods. Study participants were from a nationally representative probability sample of 2864 HIV-infected adults who were receiving medical care and were enrolled in the HIV Costs and Service Utilization Study. All interviews (91% in person, 9% by telephone)were conducted with computer-assisted personal interviewing instruments. Interviews began in January 1996 and ended 15 months later. Results. Overall, 20.5% of the women, 11.5% of the men who reported having sex with men, and 7.5% of the heterosexual men reported physical harm since diagnosis, of whom nearly half reported HIV-seropositive status as a cause of violent episodes. Conclusions. HIV-related care is an appropriate setting for routine assessment of violence. Programs to cross-train staff in antiviolence agencies and HIV care facilities need to be developed for men and women with HIV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)208-215
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume90
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2000

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Zierler, S., Cunningham, W. E., Andersen, R., Shapiro, M. F., Bozzette, S. A., Nakazono, T., Morton, S., Crystal, S., Stein, M., Turner, B., & St. Clair, P. (2000). Violence victimization after HIV infection in a US probability sample of adult patients in primary care. American journal of public health, 90(2), 208-215. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.90.2.208