Victims of Bullying and Tobacco Use Behaviors in Adolescents: Differences Between Bullied at School, Electronically, or Both

Kathleen R. Case, Maria Cooper, Me Lisa Creamer, Dale Mantey, Steven Kelder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Being a victim of bullying is associated with greater risk of youth substance use; however, research specifically examining whether tobacco use behaviors differ among adolescents who were bullied at school only, electronically only, or both at school and electronically is limited. METHODS: We examined the associations between being a victim of bullying (at school only, electronically only, or both at school and electronically) and use of tobacco products using data from the 2013 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey. RESULTS: Girls who were bullied both at school and electronically reported the highest odds of all tobacco use behaviors (ever use of cigarettes, current use of cigarettes, and current use of any tobacco product) as compared with girls who were not bullied after adjusting for covariates. Conversely, for boys, only the association between being bullied electronically only and ever use of cigarettes remained significant after adjusting for covariates. CONCLUSIONS: Results from this study indicate that electronic bullying may differentially influence the odds of tobacco use in high school students as compared with bullying that occurs at school only. Confirmation of these findings could inform interventions to reduce both bullying and tobacco use in high school.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)832-840
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of School Health
Volume86
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • bullying
  • smoking
  • tobacco
  • Youth Risk Behavior Survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Philosophy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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