Varus derotational osteotomy for spastic hip instability: the roles of femoral shortening and obturator neurectomy.

Andrew G. Yun, Richard Severino, Kent Reinker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Varus derotational osteotomy (VDRO) was used to treat 69 unstable hips in 38 patients with spastic quadriplegia. After a mean follow-up of 5.3 years, the total rate of failure as judged by either need for revision or persistent radiographic instability or dislocation was 26%. Overall outcomes were better for hips that had been more congruent (preoperative migration index < 60%) than for hips that had experienced more migration (P = .027), and more-congruent hips were 9 times more likely to be stable radiographically at follow-up (P < .001). The failure rate for VDRO combined with femoral shortening or obturator neurectomy was lower than that for VDRO alone (P = .035). VDRO is an appropriate option for treating less advanced hip subluxation and may be more reliable when combined with femoral shortening and/or obturator neurectomy. VDRO alone, however, may be insufficient for treating more advanced instability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-85
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.)
Volume34
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 2005
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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