Variations in fluconazole susceptibility and DNA subtyping of multiple Candida albicans colonies from patients with AIDS and oral candidiasis suffering one or more episodes of infection

S. W. Redding, M. A. Pfaller, S. A. Messer, J. A. Smith, J. Prows, L. L. Bradley, A. W. Fothergill, M. G. Rinaldi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Five Candida albicans colonies from each infection in AIDS patients receiving fluconazole therapy for oropharyngeal candidiasis over a 2-year period were evaluated by antifungal susceptibility testing and DNA subtyping, and the results were correlated with clinical response to determine the occurrence of clinically significant selection of more-resistant C. albicans over multiple infections. A total of 534 C. albicans isolates were obtained from 38 patients who exhibited 84 episodes of infection. Antifungal susceptibility testing revealed that the MICs for 93% of the isolates were ≤8.0 μg/ml and the MICs for 7% of the isolates were ≤64 μg/ml. DNA subtyping revealed 70 different subtypes, with 78% of patients with one infection exhibiting one DNA subtype and 80% of patients with inure than one infection exhibiting multiple DNA subtypes. Also, patients who had multiple infections had lower CD4 counts than those with single infections. Differences between the single-infection group and the multiple-infection group regarding the number of DNA subtypes and CD4 counts were both statistically significant. Of the 74 evaluable infections all were successfully treated with regular-dose (100-mg/day) fluconazole, except for three patients who ultimately responded to higher-dose fluconazole. Only one patient may have shown clinically significant selection of a more-resistant C. albicans strain over multiple courses of treatment. Interestingly, MICs reached only 8.0 μg/ml, even though doses of 400 mg of fluconazole were necessary for clinical cure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1761-1765
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of clinical microbiology
Volume35
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

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