Vaccination interest and trends in human papillomavirus vaccine uptake in young adult women aged 18 to 26 years in the united states: An analysis using the 2008-2012 national health interview survey

Susanne Schmidt, Helen M. Parsons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines have been approved since 2006, yet vaccination rates remain low. We investigated HPV vaccination trends, interest, and reasons for nonvaccination in young adult women. Methods. We used data from the 2008-2012 National Health Interview Survey to analyze HPV vaccine uptake trends (‡ 1 dose) in women aged 18 to 26 years. We used data from the 2008 and 2010 National Health Interview Survey to examine HPV vaccination interest and reasons for nonvaccination among unvaccinated women. Results. We saw significant increases in HPV vaccination for all young women from 2008 to 2012 (11.6% to 34.1%); however, Hispanics and women with limited access to care continued to have lower vaccination rates. Logistic regression demonstrated lower vaccination interest among unvaccinated women in 2010 than 2008. Respondents in 2010 were significantly less likely to give lack of knowledge as a primary reason for nonvaccination. Conclusions. Uptake of HPV vaccine has increased from 2008 to 2012 in young women. Yet vaccination rates remain low, especially among women with limited access to care. However, unvaccinated women with limited health care access were more likely to be interested in receiving the vaccine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)946-953
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume104
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Papillomavirus Vaccines
Health Surveys
Young Adult
Vaccination
Interviews
Hispanic Americans
Vaccines
Logistic Models
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Vaccination interest and trends in human papillomavirus vaccine uptake in young adult women aged 18 to 26 years in the united states: An analysis using the 2008-2012 national health interview survey",
abstract = "Objectives. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines have been approved since 2006, yet vaccination rates remain low. We investigated HPV vaccination trends, interest, and reasons for nonvaccination in young adult women. Methods. We used data from the 2008-2012 National Health Interview Survey to analyze HPV vaccine uptake trends (‡ 1 dose) in women aged 18 to 26 years. We used data from the 2008 and 2010 National Health Interview Survey to examine HPV vaccination interest and reasons for nonvaccination among unvaccinated women. Results. We saw significant increases in HPV vaccination for all young women from 2008 to 2012 (11.6{\%} to 34.1{\%}); however, Hispanics and women with limited access to care continued to have lower vaccination rates. Logistic regression demonstrated lower vaccination interest among unvaccinated women in 2010 than 2008. Respondents in 2010 were significantly less likely to give lack of knowledge as a primary reason for nonvaccination. Conclusions. Uptake of HPV vaccine has increased from 2008 to 2012 in young women. Yet vaccination rates remain low, especially among women with limited access to care. However, unvaccinated women with limited health care access were more likely to be interested in receiving the vaccine.",
author = "Susanne Schmidt and Parsons, {Helen M.}",
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AU - Parsons, Helen M.

PY - 2014

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N2 - Objectives. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines have been approved since 2006, yet vaccination rates remain low. We investigated HPV vaccination trends, interest, and reasons for nonvaccination in young adult women. Methods. We used data from the 2008-2012 National Health Interview Survey to analyze HPV vaccine uptake trends (‡ 1 dose) in women aged 18 to 26 years. We used data from the 2008 and 2010 National Health Interview Survey to examine HPV vaccination interest and reasons for nonvaccination among unvaccinated women. Results. We saw significant increases in HPV vaccination for all young women from 2008 to 2012 (11.6% to 34.1%); however, Hispanics and women with limited access to care continued to have lower vaccination rates. Logistic regression demonstrated lower vaccination interest among unvaccinated women in 2010 than 2008. Respondents in 2010 were significantly less likely to give lack of knowledge as a primary reason for nonvaccination. Conclusions. Uptake of HPV vaccine has increased from 2008 to 2012 in young women. Yet vaccination rates remain low, especially among women with limited access to care. However, unvaccinated women with limited health care access were more likely to be interested in receiving the vaccine.

AB - Objectives. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines have been approved since 2006, yet vaccination rates remain low. We investigated HPV vaccination trends, interest, and reasons for nonvaccination in young adult women. Methods. We used data from the 2008-2012 National Health Interview Survey to analyze HPV vaccine uptake trends (‡ 1 dose) in women aged 18 to 26 years. We used data from the 2008 and 2010 National Health Interview Survey to examine HPV vaccination interest and reasons for nonvaccination among unvaccinated women. Results. We saw significant increases in HPV vaccination for all young women from 2008 to 2012 (11.6% to 34.1%); however, Hispanics and women with limited access to care continued to have lower vaccination rates. Logistic regression demonstrated lower vaccination interest among unvaccinated women in 2010 than 2008. Respondents in 2010 were significantly less likely to give lack of knowledge as a primary reason for nonvaccination. Conclusions. Uptake of HPV vaccine has increased from 2008 to 2012 in young women. Yet vaccination rates remain low, especially among women with limited access to care. However, unvaccinated women with limited health care access were more likely to be interested in receiving the vaccine.

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