Using scripted cooperation to communicate information about the consequences of alcohol and cocaine use

Sandra M. Dees, Donald F. Dansereau, Kevin Knight, Jennifer L. Peel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Fifty-two participants from undergraduate psychology classes at a private university were asked to study, either cooperatively or individually, information dealing with the consequences of using alcohol and cocaine. Objectives were to (a) determine the effect of cooperative study on recall, (b) assess personal reactions to the information presented, and (c) assess the effect of individual differences. Findings indicate that cooperative study can facilitate both recall of information as well as degree of understanding and confidence in dealing with persons using alcohol/cocaine; that the materials used were received positively; and that verbal ability may play a subtle role in college students' responses to alcohol/cocaine information

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)153-166
Number of pages14
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Consequences study strategy
  • Cooperative study strategy
  • Information strategies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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