Using grip strength force curves to detect simulation: A preliminary investigation

Jeremy J. Davis, Jacqueline R. Wall, Crystal K. Ramos, Kriscinda A. Whitney, Mark T. Barisa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Analysis of grip strength force curves has successfully detected suboptimal effort in industrial rehabilitation research. This study examined force curve analysis as an effort measure when grip strength was administered according to standardized neuropsychological procedures in a sample without reported neurologic and upper extremity injury. Eighty-two undergraduates were randomized to control (n=26), naïve simulator (n=28), and coached simulator (n=28) conditions. Outcome measures included grip strength in kilograms, variables calculated from grip strength force curves, and the Word Memory Test (WMT). While average force in kilograms was not significantly different between groups, significant differences were found on the average to peak force ratio as calculated from grip strength force curves. The classification accuracy of average to peak force ratio was lower than the WMT, but comparable to other effort measures. Force curve analysis may warrant further study in a clinical sample.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)204-211
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Clinical Neuropsychology
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Effort assessment
  • Grip strength
  • Simulated malingering
  • Symptom validity testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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