Uptake by cells of nucleic acids promoted by compounds sharing the pleiotropic effects of poly(ethylene glycol)

Robert J. Klebe, Danelle P. Hanson, June V. Harris, Kevin L. Bentley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is a member of a group of membrane active compounds that have pleiotropic effects on cells, eg, promotion of cell fusion, induction of erythroleukemia cell differentiation, and protection of cells from freezing damage. Since PEG has recently been shown to be an efficient promoter of genetic transformation in bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cells, studies were carried out to determine whether other PEG‐related compounds could also promote genetic transformation. In this study, 24 compounds, which behave like PEG in other biological systems, are shown to promote transfection of human cells with isolated poliovirus RNA. That PEG and other commercially important compounds promote transfection indicates that such compounds may represent a biohazard to man.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)245-250
Number of pages6
JournalTeratogenesis Carcinogenesis and Mutagenesis
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1986

Keywords

  • cell differentiation
  • cell fusion
  • cryoprotective agents
  • genetic transformation
  • poly(ethylene glycol)
  • transfection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Genetics
  • Toxicology
  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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