Treatment retention, occupational role, and cocaine use in methadone maintenance

Richard J Lamb, Kimberly C. Kirby, Jerome J. Platt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors interviewed methadone maintenance patients (N = 264) reporting cocaine use in the previous year to examine the relationship between treatment retention, occupational role, and continued cocaine use. Treatment retention was positively correlated with reduced cocaine use. Patients who had been in treatment longer than 6 months were less likely to have used cocaine in the previous month than patients who had been in treatment 6 months or less. Patients who were employed full-time, were full-time homemakers, or full-time students were less likely to have used cocaine in the previous month than those who were unemployed or employed only part-time or occasionally. The effects of occupational role and treatment retention were additive.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12-17
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal on Addictions
Volume5
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Methadone
Cocaine
Therapeutics
Students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Treatment retention, occupational role, and cocaine use in methadone maintenance. / Lamb, Richard J; Kirby, Kimberly C.; Platt, Jerome J.

In: American Journal on Addictions, Vol. 5, No. 1, 12.1996, p. 12-17.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lamb, Richard J ; Kirby, Kimberly C. ; Platt, Jerome J. / Treatment retention, occupational role, and cocaine use in methadone maintenance. In: American Journal on Addictions. 1996 ; Vol. 5, No. 1. pp. 12-17.
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