Transsylvian-Transinsular Approach for an Insular Cavernous Malformation Resection: 3-Dimensional Operative Video

Justin R Mascitelli, Sirin Gandhi, Ernest Wright, Michael T. Lawton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Surgical resection of insular lesions is challenging due to their proximity to critical neurovascular structures such as the middle cerebral arteries (MCA), Sylvian veins, thalamus, internal capsule (IC), and lenticulostriate arteries. A surgical series using the transsylvian-transinsular approach to treat cerebrovascular pathologies reported ∼5% permanent neurological morbidity.1,2 This case demonstrates the utility of this approach for resecting an insular cavernous malformation (CM).A 25-yr-old female presented with an acute-onset right homonymous hemianopsia. Neuroimaging revealed a large left insular CM, adjacent to the posterior limb of IC. After obtaining IRB approval and patient consent, a left pterional craniotomy with a wide distal Sylvian fissure split was completed. Using neuronavigation, an insular entry point was chosen for corticectomy. The CM was opened with subsequent hematoma evacuation and intracapsular resection technique. Inspection of the cavity revealed remnants anteromedially near the IC, which were removed meticulously, mobilizing the CM away from the IC. Postoperative MRI demonstrated gross total resection of the CM. The patient was discharged home on postoperative day 5 with persistent homonymous hemianopia.This case describes the use of a transsylvian-transinsular approach to access deep lesions with the shortest surgical distance and minimal cortical transgression. A wide Sylvian fissure split exposes the M2 MCA and accesses a safe insular zone, keeping the most eloquent structures deep to the lesion in the surgical corridor. This approach can safely expose vascular pathologies in the insular region without the risk of injury to overlying eloquent frontal and temporal lobes, even in the dominant hemisphere.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalOperative neurosurgery (Hagerstown, Md.)
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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