Transportability and feasibility of Social Cognition and Interaction Training (SCIT) in community settings

David Roberts, David L. Penn, Daniella Labate, Seth A. Margolis, Abram Sterne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Social Cognition and Interaction Training (SCIT) is a manual-based group intervention designed to improve social cognition in schizophrenia. Initial studies conducted by the developers of SCIT suggest that the intervention has promise in ameliorating social cognitive dysfunction in both inpatients and outpatients. Aims: The current study is a preliminary evaluation of SCIT in community samples. Method: An uncontrolled, pre-post design was used in this initial feasibility study. A collaborative research-clinical approach was employed to enable research evaluation while also meeting the administrative goals of participating clinics, and working within the constraints of real-world clinical practice. Transportability, acceptability, and feasibility of SCIT were evaluated in terms of pre- and post-treatment evaluations, client attendance data (N = 50), and clinic administrators decisions about whether to integrate SCIT into regular programming. Social-cognitive outcome measures assessed emotion perception, Theory of Mind, and attributional bias. Results: These support the transportability, acceptability, and feasibility of SCIT in community settings. SCIT has been integrated into routine practice at several test sites. Tentative support was found for improvement in emotion perception and Theory of Mind, but not attributional bias. Conclusions: SCIT may be a promising intervention for community agencies serving individuals with psychotic disorders who seek to improve their social functioning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-47
Number of pages13
JournalBehavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Interpersonal Relations
Cognition
Theory of Mind
Emotions
Feasibility Studies
Administrative Personnel
Psychotic Disorders
Inpatients
Schizophrenia
Outpatients
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Therapeutics
Research

Keywords

  • Attributional bias
  • Emotion perception
  • Schizophrenia
  • Social cognition
  • Theory of Mind
  • Transportability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Transportability and feasibility of Social Cognition and Interaction Training (SCIT) in community settings. / Roberts, David; Penn, David L.; Labate, Daniella; Margolis, Seth A.; Sterne, Abram.

In: Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, Vol. 38, No. 1, 01.2010, p. 35-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roberts, David ; Penn, David L. ; Labate, Daniella ; Margolis, Seth A. ; Sterne, Abram. / Transportability and feasibility of Social Cognition and Interaction Training (SCIT) in community settings. In: Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy. 2010 ; Vol. 38, No. 1. pp. 35-47.
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