Transmitted drug resistance among antiretroviral-naive patients with established HIV type 1 infection in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic and review of the Latin American and Caribbean literature

Julie E. Myers, Barbara Taylor, Rita A. Rojas Fermín, Emily Virginia Reyes, Catherine Vaughan, Lina José, Carmen Javier, Ramona Franco Estévez, Yeycy Donastorg Cabral, Arelis Batista, Yolanda Lie, Eoin Coakley, Scott M. Hammer, Karen Brudney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Emergence of HIV resistance is a concerning consequence of global scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART). To date, there is no published information about HIV resistance from the Dominican Republic. The study's aim was to determine the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) to reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors in a sample of chronically HIV-1-infected patients in one clinic in Santo Domingo. The data are presented in the context of a review of the TDR literature from Latin America and the Caribbean. Genotype testing was successfully performed on 103 treatment-naive adults planning to initiate antiretroviral therapy; the World Health Organization (WHO) list of surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRM) was used to determine the presence of TDR mutations. WHO SDRM were identified in eight patients (7.8%); none had received sdNVP. There were no significant differences in epidemiologic or clinical variables between those with or without WHO SDRM. The prevalence of WHO SDRM was 1.0% and 6.8% for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, respectively. No WHO SDRMs for protease inhibitors were identified. Among 12 studies of TDR in the region with a sample size of at least 100 subjects, the reported prevalence of SDRM ranged from 2.8% to 8.1%. The most commonly identified SDRM was K103N. This information adds to our understanding of the epidemiology of TDR in the region and the possible role such mutations could play in undermining first-line treatment. Ongoing surveillance is clearly needed to better understand the TDR phenomenon in the Caribbean.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)667-674
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Volume28
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2012

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Dominican Republic
Drug Resistance
HIV Infections
HIV-1
Mutation
Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors
Protease Inhibitors
HIV
Latin America
Therapeutics
Nucleosides
Sample Size

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Transmitted drug resistance among antiretroviral-naive patients with established HIV type 1 infection in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic and review of the Latin American and Caribbean literature. / Myers, Julie E.; Taylor, Barbara; Rojas Fermín, Rita A.; Reyes, Emily Virginia; Vaughan, Catherine; José, Lina; Javier, Carmen; Franco Estévez, Ramona; Donastorg Cabral, Yeycy; Batista, Arelis; Lie, Yolanda; Coakley, Eoin; Hammer, Scott M.; Brudney, Karen.

In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, Vol. 28, No. 7, 01.07.2012, p. 667-674.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Myers, JE, Taylor, B, Rojas Fermín, RA, Reyes, EV, Vaughan, C, José, L, Javier, C, Franco Estévez, R, Donastorg Cabral, Y, Batista, A, Lie, Y, Coakley, E, Hammer, SM & Brudney, K 2012, 'Transmitted drug resistance among antiretroviral-naive patients with established HIV type 1 infection in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic and review of the Latin American and Caribbean literature', AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, vol. 28, no. 7, pp. 667-674. https://doi.org/10.1089/aid.2010.0355
Myers, Julie E. ; Taylor, Barbara ; Rojas Fermín, Rita A. ; Reyes, Emily Virginia ; Vaughan, Catherine ; José, Lina ; Javier, Carmen ; Franco Estévez, Ramona ; Donastorg Cabral, Yeycy ; Batista, Arelis ; Lie, Yolanda ; Coakley, Eoin ; Hammer, Scott M. ; Brudney, Karen. / Transmitted drug resistance among antiretroviral-naive patients with established HIV type 1 infection in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic and review of the Latin American and Caribbean literature. In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses. 2012 ; Vol. 28, No. 7. pp. 667-674.
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