Transcutaneous electrical stimulation on the anterior neck region: The impact of pulse duration and frequency on maximum amplitude tolerance and perceived discomfort

Ali Barikroo, Giselle Carnaby, Donald Bolser, Ronald Rozensky, Michael Crary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Maximum amplitude tolerance (MAT) has been known as a primary factor determining the depth of electrical current penetration. However, the effect of varying transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) parameters on MAT and discomfort level is poorly understood. Furthermore, limited information exists regarding the biopsychological factors that may impact MAT and discomfort. The primary aims of this study were to compare the effects TES protocol with varying levels of pulse duration (300 μs vs 700 μs) and frequency (30 Hz vs 80 Hz) on the MAT and discomfort in healthy older adults. The exploratory aim of this study was to examine relationships between submental adipose tissue thickness, pain sensitivity and gender with MAT and discomfort. Twenty-four healthy older adults participated in this study. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation was delivered to the submental region. Maximum amplitude tolerance and discomfort were measured for each condition. Furthermore, submental adipose tissue thickness and pain sensitivity were measured for each subject. Maximum amplitude tolerance was significantly increased for the TES protocols with short-pulse duration [F (3, 69) = 38.695, P <.0001]. Discomfort was similar across different TES protocols. Submental adipose tissue thickness (r =.30, P <.003) and pain sensitivity (r = −.43, P <.0001) were related to MAT. Pain sensitivity rating was also related to discomfort (r =.45, P <.0001). In conclusion, using TES protocols with short-pulse duration may increase the MAT. Higher amplitude stimulation may increase the impact on deep swallowing muscles. In addition, submental adipose tissue thickness and pain sensitivity are potential biopsychological factors that may affect MAT and discomfort.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)436-441
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Oral Rehabilitation
Volume45
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • ageing
  • deglutition
  • deglutition disorders
  • electric stimulation therapy
  • neck muscles
  • rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Transcutaneous electrical stimulation on the anterior neck region: The impact of pulse duration and frequency on maximum amplitude tolerance and perceived discomfort'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this