Torsional injury resulting in disc degeneration in the rabbit: II. Associative changes in dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord neurotransmitter production

Alexander G. Hadjipavlou, James W. Simmons, Jinping P. Yang, Lin Xiang Bi, David J. Simmons, Jeffrey T. Necessary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

The mechanism mediating the chronic pain associated with lumbar disc degeneration may involve neurotransmitters elaborated by dorsal root ganglion (DRG). This hypothesis has been tested in an applicable rabbit model of disc degeneration. Twenty control male rabbits underwent a soft-tissue release; 20 experimental rabbits sustained a facetectomy and capsulotomy and received an acute torsional lumbar injury. The levels of calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and substance P were measured in the DRG, spinal cord, and disc at 10, 30, 60, and 90 days postoperatively. Torsional injury was associated with a statistically significant increase in most DRG and spinal cord neurotransmitter values after 60-90 days. These points in time marked the periods of maximum biomechanical instability and disc narrowing. Such data support concepts about the association between chronic lumbar spinal instability, disc degeneration, and pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)318-321
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Spinal Disorders
Volume11
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Aug 28 1998

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • CGRP
  • Injury
  • Lumbar spine
  • Neuropeptides
  • Substance P
  • VIP

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Hadjipavlou, A. G., Simmons, J. W., Yang, J. P., Bi, L. X., Simmons, D. J., & Necessary, J. T. (1998). Torsional injury resulting in disc degeneration in the rabbit: II. Associative changes in dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord neurotransmitter production. Journal of Spinal Disorders, 11(4), 318-321.