Thromboembolic complications related to indwelling central venous catheters in children

César O. Freytes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose of review: Thrombosis is one of the most frequent complications of indwelling central venous catheters. During the past year, new information has emerged regarding the incidence and predisposing factors of thromboembolic complications of indwelling central venous catheters. Because indwelling central venous catheters are widely used, it is important to be aware of new information regarding thromboembolic complications of these devices. Recent findings: Recent studies have better defined the risks of thromboembolic complications in patients with cancer with indwelling central venous catheters. Acquired hypercoagulable disorders such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, antiphospholipid syndrome, and therapy with asparaginase are associated with thromboembolic disorders in patients with indwelling central venous catheters. Studies analyzing the association between inherited hypercoagulable disorders and thrombosis have shown conflicting results. Preliminary studies suggest that low molecular weight heparins could have a role in the prevention of catheter-related thromboembolic disorders. Nevertheless, larger prospective studies will be necessary to determine the role of anticoagulants in the prevention of thromboembolic disorders in patients with cancer with indwelling central venous catheters. Summary: Recent reports will facilitate the evaluation and risk assessment of children with cancer who have indwelling central venous catheters. Despite these advances, large, controlled studies focusing on specific populations of patients, such as children, should be undertaken to determine the true performance and optimal use of indwelling central venous catheters. Future studies should also address better ways to prevent catheter-related thrombosis and infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)289-292
Number of pages4
JournalCurrent Opinion in Oncology
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2003

Fingerprint

Indwelling Catheters
Central Venous Catheters
Thrombosis
Asparaginase
Catheter-Related Infections
Neoplasms
Antiphospholipid Syndrome
Low Molecular Weight Heparin
Causality
Thrombocytopenia
Anticoagulants
Heparin
Catheters
Prospective Studies
Equipment and Supplies
Incidence

Keywords

  • Catheter
  • Catheterization
  • Central venous
  • Child
  • Indwelling
  • Neoplasm
  • Thrombosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Thromboembolic complications related to indwelling central venous catheters in children. / Freytes, César O.

In: Current Opinion in Oncology, Vol. 15, No. 4, 07.2003, p. 289-292.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5ecd43ae7a5c4a68b981c4685eb1806e,
title = "Thromboembolic complications related to indwelling central venous catheters in children",
abstract = "Purpose of review: Thrombosis is one of the most frequent complications of indwelling central venous catheters. During the past year, new information has emerged regarding the incidence and predisposing factors of thromboembolic complications of indwelling central venous catheters. Because indwelling central venous catheters are widely used, it is important to be aware of new information regarding thromboembolic complications of these devices. Recent findings: Recent studies have better defined the risks of thromboembolic complications in patients with cancer with indwelling central venous catheters. Acquired hypercoagulable disorders such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, antiphospholipid syndrome, and therapy with asparaginase are associated with thromboembolic disorders in patients with indwelling central venous catheters. Studies analyzing the association between inherited hypercoagulable disorders and thrombosis have shown conflicting results. Preliminary studies suggest that low molecular weight heparins could have a role in the prevention of catheter-related thromboembolic disorders. Nevertheless, larger prospective studies will be necessary to determine the role of anticoagulants in the prevention of thromboembolic disorders in patients with cancer with indwelling central venous catheters. Summary: Recent reports will facilitate the evaluation and risk assessment of children with cancer who have indwelling central venous catheters. Despite these advances, large, controlled studies focusing on specific populations of patients, such as children, should be undertaken to determine the true performance and optimal use of indwelling central venous catheters. Future studies should also address better ways to prevent catheter-related thrombosis and infection.",
keywords = "Catheter, Catheterization, Central venous, Child, Indwelling, Neoplasm, Thrombosis",
author = "Freytes, {C{\'e}sar O.}",
year = "2003",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1097/00001622-200307000-00002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "15",
pages = "289--292",
journal = "Current Opinion in Oncology",
issn = "1040-8746",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Thromboembolic complications related to indwelling central venous catheters in children

AU - Freytes, César O.

PY - 2003/7

Y1 - 2003/7

N2 - Purpose of review: Thrombosis is one of the most frequent complications of indwelling central venous catheters. During the past year, new information has emerged regarding the incidence and predisposing factors of thromboembolic complications of indwelling central venous catheters. Because indwelling central venous catheters are widely used, it is important to be aware of new information regarding thromboembolic complications of these devices. Recent findings: Recent studies have better defined the risks of thromboembolic complications in patients with cancer with indwelling central venous catheters. Acquired hypercoagulable disorders such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, antiphospholipid syndrome, and therapy with asparaginase are associated with thromboembolic disorders in patients with indwelling central venous catheters. Studies analyzing the association between inherited hypercoagulable disorders and thrombosis have shown conflicting results. Preliminary studies suggest that low molecular weight heparins could have a role in the prevention of catheter-related thromboembolic disorders. Nevertheless, larger prospective studies will be necessary to determine the role of anticoagulants in the prevention of thromboembolic disorders in patients with cancer with indwelling central venous catheters. Summary: Recent reports will facilitate the evaluation and risk assessment of children with cancer who have indwelling central venous catheters. Despite these advances, large, controlled studies focusing on specific populations of patients, such as children, should be undertaken to determine the true performance and optimal use of indwelling central venous catheters. Future studies should also address better ways to prevent catheter-related thrombosis and infection.

AB - Purpose of review: Thrombosis is one of the most frequent complications of indwelling central venous catheters. During the past year, new information has emerged regarding the incidence and predisposing factors of thromboembolic complications of indwelling central venous catheters. Because indwelling central venous catheters are widely used, it is important to be aware of new information regarding thromboembolic complications of these devices. Recent findings: Recent studies have better defined the risks of thromboembolic complications in patients with cancer with indwelling central venous catheters. Acquired hypercoagulable disorders such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, antiphospholipid syndrome, and therapy with asparaginase are associated with thromboembolic disorders in patients with indwelling central venous catheters. Studies analyzing the association between inherited hypercoagulable disorders and thrombosis have shown conflicting results. Preliminary studies suggest that low molecular weight heparins could have a role in the prevention of catheter-related thromboembolic disorders. Nevertheless, larger prospective studies will be necessary to determine the role of anticoagulants in the prevention of thromboembolic disorders in patients with cancer with indwelling central venous catheters. Summary: Recent reports will facilitate the evaluation and risk assessment of children with cancer who have indwelling central venous catheters. Despite these advances, large, controlled studies focusing on specific populations of patients, such as children, should be undertaken to determine the true performance and optimal use of indwelling central venous catheters. Future studies should also address better ways to prevent catheter-related thrombosis and infection.

KW - Catheter

KW - Catheterization

KW - Central venous

KW - Child

KW - Indwelling

KW - Neoplasm

KW - Thrombosis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0043240372&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0043240372&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00001622-200307000-00002

DO - 10.1097/00001622-200307000-00002

M3 - Article

C2 - 12874506

AN - SCOPUS:0043240372

VL - 15

SP - 289

EP - 292

JO - Current Opinion in Oncology

JF - Current Opinion in Oncology

SN - 1040-8746

IS - 4

ER -