The use of alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers on 316L stainless steel for coronary artery stent nanomedicine applications: an oxidative and in vitro stability study

Anil Mahapatro, Dave M. Johnson, Devang N. Patel, Marc D. Feldman, Arturo A. Ayon, C. Mauli Agrawal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

The use of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on medical devices offers a methodology for the incorporation of nanotechnology into medicine. SAMs are highly ordered nanosized molecular coatings, adding 1 to 10 nm thickness to a surface. This work is part of an overall goal to deliver therapeutic drugs from the surface of metal coronary stents using SAMs. In this study the oxidative and in vitro stability of functional alkylthiol SAMs on 316L stainless steel (SS) has been demonstrated. SAMs of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (-COOH SAM) and 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (-OH SAM) were formed on 316L SS. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and contact angle (CA) measurements collectively confirmed the formation of functional alkylthiol SAMs on 316L SS. Well-formed SAMs (CA: 82 deg ± 9 deg) were achieved within 48 hours of immersion in ethanolic solutions, after which no significant improvement in CA was observed. The ratio of the thiolate peak (163.5 eV) to the oxidized sulfur (sulfonates) peak (166.5 eV) gives us an indication of the percentage SAMs that would bind to the metal and serve as a drug reservoir in vivo; which in turn represents the stability and viability of these SAMs, keeping in mind the cardiovascular application under consideration. Oxidative and in vitro stability studies showed that alkanethiol SAMs oxidized completely within 14 days. The SAMs tend to desorb and leave the metal surface after longer time periods (21 days) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) immersion, whereas for oxidative exposure the SAMs continue to remain on the metal surface in the form of sulfonates. Although the chemistry of bonding of alkylthiol with the 316L SS is not well understood, the nanosized alkylthiol SAMs demonstrate sufficient stability to justify further study on these systems for potential in vivo drug delivery in the chosen coronary artery stent applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)182-190
Number of pages9
JournalNanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Pharmaceutical Science

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