The satisfaction of Latina breast cancer survivors with their healthcare and health-related quality of life

Kimberly A. Wildes, Alexander R. Miller, Sandra San Miguel De Majors, Pamela M. Otto, Amelie G. Ramirez

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Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship of satisfaction with the cancer care doctor and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among Latina breast cancer survivors (BCS) by (1) assessing whether satisfaction would be positively correlated with HRQOL and (2) assessing whether satisfaction would significantly influence HRQOL while controlling for covariates. Methods: The cross-sectional study used self-report data from 117 Latina BCS. Satisfaction was measured with the Hall Satisfaction Index, and HRQOL was measured with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G). Analyses included calculation of descriptive statistics, t tests, bivariate correlations, analyses of variance (ANOVAs), and multivariate analyses. Results: Latina BCS had high satisfaction and generally good HRQOL. The Hall Satisfaction Index total score was positively associated with FACT-G functional well-being (r=0.265, p=0.004). Multivariate analyses showed that the Hall Satisfaction Index total score was a significant predictor of FACT-G functional well-being (p=0.012). Employment status was also a significant predictor, where being employed or retired resulted in better functional well-being than being unemployed. Conclusions: Latina BCS were quite satisfied with their cancer care doctors, and high levels of satisfaction with the cancer care doctor influenced functional well-being when confounding variables were controlled. Despite reportedly high satisfaction, Latina BCS did report barriers to satisfaction that could be considered cultural. Implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1065-1074
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Women's Health
Volume20
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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