The role of parental and grandparental epigenetic alterations in familial cancer risk

Jessica L. Fleming, Hui-ming Huang, Amanda Ewart Toland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Epigenetic alterations of the genome such as DNA promoter methylation and chromatin remodeling play an important role in tumorigenesis. These modifications take place throughout development with subsequent events occurring later in adulthood. Recent studies, however, suggest that some epigenetic alterations that influence cancer risk are inherited through the germline from parent to child and are observed in multiple generations. Epigenetic changes may be inherited as Mendelian, non-Mendelian, or environmentally induced traits. Here, we will discuss Mendelian, non-Mendelian, and environmentally induced patterns of multigenerational epigenetic alterations as well as some possible mechanisms for how these events may be occurring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9116-9121
Number of pages6
JournalCancer Research
Volume68
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Epigenomics
Neoplasms
Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly
DNA Methylation
Carcinogenesis
Genome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

The role of parental and grandparental epigenetic alterations in familial cancer risk. / Fleming, Jessica L.; Huang, Hui-ming; Toland, Amanda Ewart.

In: Cancer Research, Vol. 68, No. 22, 15.11.2008, p. 9116-9121.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fleming, Jessica L. ; Huang, Hui-ming ; Toland, Amanda Ewart. / The role of parental and grandparental epigenetic alterations in familial cancer risk. In: Cancer Research. 2008 ; Vol. 68, No. 22. pp. 9116-9121.
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