The Ricochet-Scepter Technique: A Balloon-Assisted Technique to Achieve Outflow Access During Pipeline-Assisted Coil Embolization of a Near-Giant Internal Carotid Artery Ophthalmic Aneurysm

Victoria E. Fischer, Samon Tavakoli, Pavel Rodriguez, Lee A. Birnbaum, Justin R. Mascitelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Flow diversion with or without coil embolization has become the first-line treatment for large or giant paraclinoid internal carotid artery intracranial aneurysms. Oftentimes, these sizable aneurysms impose anatomical challenges to endovascular treatment through limiting both distal outflow access and maintenance of distal vessel purchase during catheter reduction, which are required for successful stent placement. Various strategies to obtain and maintain distal access within the parent vessel have been described previously; however, new techniques may need to be employed when more standard maneuvers fail. Case Description: This paper depicts a case of successful flow diversion of a near-giant internal carotid artery ophthalmic aneurysm in a middle-aged female patient using a balloon-assisted technique, designated the Ricochet-Scepter technique, to achieve distal outflow access followed by secondary system reduction via a stent retriever after standard maneuvers had failed. Conclusions: Giant, wide-neck aneurysms present treatment challenges that may require using adjunctive devices and advanced endovascular techniques. When routine strategies for gaining distal outflow access fail, the Ricochet-Scepter technique is a viable option for achieving distal access.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-56
Number of pages6
JournalWorld neurosurgery
Volume145
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Cerebral angiography
  • Fluoroscopy
  • Intracranial aneurysm
  • Stents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The Ricochet-Scepter Technique: A Balloon-Assisted Technique to Achieve Outflow Access During Pipeline-Assisted Coil Embolization of a Near-Giant Internal Carotid Artery Ophthalmic Aneurysm'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this