The Relationship between Neighborhood Immigrant Composition, Limited English Proficiency, and Late-Stage Colorectal Cancer Diagnosis in California

Cynthia M. Mojica, Beth A. Glenn, Cindy Chang, Roshan Bastani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the availability of effective early detection technologies, more than half (61%) of colorectal cancers in the United States and 55% in California are identified at an advanced stage. Data on colorectal cancer patients (N = 35,030) diagnosed from 2005 to 2007 were obtained from the California Cancer Registry. Multivariate analyses found a relationship among neighborhood concentration of recent immigrants, neighborhood rates of limited English proficiency, and late-stage colorectal cancer diagnosis. Hispanics living in neighborhoods with a greater percentage of recent immigrants (compared to the lowest percentage) had greater odds (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.22, 2.02) of late-stage diagnosis whereas Hispanics living in neighborhoods with the highest percentage of limited English proficiency (compared to the lowest percentage) had lower odds (OR.71, 95% CI.51,.99) of late-stage diagnosis. These relationships were not observed for other ethnic groups. Results highlight the complex relationship among race/ethnicity, neighborhood characteristics, and colorectal cancer stage at diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number460181
JournalBioMed Research International
Volume2015
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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Colorectal Neoplasms
Chemical analysis
Delayed Diagnosis
Hispanic Americans
Ethnic Groups
Availability
Registries
Multivariate Analysis
Technology
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

The Relationship between Neighborhood Immigrant Composition, Limited English Proficiency, and Late-Stage Colorectal Cancer Diagnosis in California. / Mojica, Cynthia M.; Glenn, Beth A.; Chang, Cindy; Bastani, Roshan.

In: BioMed Research International, Vol. 2015, 460181, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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