The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome did not increase in Mexico City between 1990-1992 and 1997-1999 despite more central obesity

Carlos Lorenzo, Ken Williams, Clicerio Gonzalez-Villalpando, Steven M. Haffner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - Trends in the metabolic syndrome might follow trends in obesity. We examined this hypothesis in the Mexico City Diabetes Study (MCDS), a study that showed rising trends in obesity, and the effect of the metabolic syndrome on the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Designed as a population-based study, the MCDS enrolled subjects in 1990-1992 (n = 2,282). Follow-up visits were held in 1993-1995 (n = 1,764) and 1997-1999 (n = 1,754). We used the revised metabolic syndrome definition of the National Cholesterol Education Program and the Framingham equations to estimate the 10-year CHD risk. RESULTS - In men, the age-adjusted prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was 38.9% in 1990-1992, 43.4% in 1993-1995, and 39.9% in 1997-1999; in women, the prevalences were 65.4, 65.7, and 59.9%, respectively. The prevalence did not change in men (P = 0.349) between 1990-1992 and 1997-1999, but decreased in women (P < 0.001). A prevalence increase was demonstrated for elevated waist circumference (men, P < 0.001; women, P < 0.050), elevated fasting glucose value (men and women, P < 0.001), and low HDL cholesterol level (men, P < 0.050; women, P < 0.010); a prevalence decrease was seen for high blood pressure (men and women, P < 0.001) and hypertriglyceridemia (men, P < 0.001; women, P < 0.010). CHD risk decreased marginally in men (P < 0.050) but did not change in women (P = 0.943). CONCLUSIONS - Neither the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome nor CHD risk has increased in Mexico City. Lower blood pressure and triglyceride values appear to have counter-acted increases in central obesity and fasting glucose.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2480-2485
Number of pages6
JournalDiabetes care
Volume28
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

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