The p53 tumor suppressor gene in breast cancer

Richard M. Elledge, D. Craig Allred

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

141 Scopus citations

Abstract

Alterations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most common genetic changes found so far in breast cancer, suggesting that the gene plays a central role in the development of the disease. p53 functions as a negative regulator of cell growth, and alterations in the gene lead to loss of this negative growth regulation and more rapid cell proliferation. A number of independent groups using different methods of detection have shown that p53 alterations are associated with more aggressive tumor biologic factors and a poorer prognosis in breast cancer patients. Because of its possible role in the regulation of apoptosis and response to DNA damage, p53 status could also be a predictive marker for response to hormonal or chemotherapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-47
Number of pages9
JournalBreast Cancer Research and Treatment
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • p53 gene
  • p53 protein
  • prognosis
  • therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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