The National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project Sleep Health Surveillance Questionnaire as an Obstructive Sleep Apnea Surveillance Tool

Youngsin Jung, Mithri R. Junna, Jayawant N. Mandrekar, Timothy I. Morgenthaler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Study Objectives: To validate the previously published National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project (NHSAP) Surveillance and Epidemiology Workgroup questionnaire for ability to determine risk for moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods: The NHSAP sleep questions, part of the next Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), were constructed to mimic elements of the STOP sleep apnea questionnaire, and included number of days with sleep disruption and unintentional dozing and a history of snoring and apneas. The responses to four sleep questions from the BRFSS were collected from 352 adults undergoing in-laboratory polysomnography at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Demographic and clinical information, including sex, age, body mass index (BMI), and presence of hypertension, which will be available in other parts of the complete BRFSS, were obtained by chart review. Univariate and logistic regression analyses were performed, and values of P < .05 were considered to be statistically significant. Results: Fifty-five percent of subjects were men and 45% were women with a median age of 58 years and BMI 32.2 kg/m2. Sixty percent had no or mild OSA, and 40% had moderate to severe OSA. No single question was superior in screening for moderate to severe OSA, although a history of snoring and witnessed apneas was more likely to predict moderate to severe OSA. Male sex, age ≥ 50 years, BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, presence of hypertension, and a history of snoring and witnessed apneas were the most highly weighted factors in predicting moderate to severe OSA. When each variable was dichotomized to a single point, a cutoff of 5 points significantly predicted a high risk of moderate to severe OSA with an odds ratio of 3.87 (2.39–6.27). Conclusions: Although many variables were positively associated with the apnea-hypopnea index, no single factor was superior in predicting moderate to severe OSA. Male sex, increased age, higher BMI, hypertension, and a history of snoring and witnessed apneas are the most highly predictive of moderate to severe OSA. Combined use of the NHSAP questionnaire and demographic and clinical characteristics could be considered for screening for moderate to severe OSA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1067-1074
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
Volume13
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project
  • Obstructive sleep apnea
  • Questionnaire
  • Sleep health surveillance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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