The multi-faceted cross-talk between the insulin and angiotensin II signaling systems

Licio A. Velloso, Franco Folli, Lucia Perego, Mario J A Saad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Insulin and angiotensin II are hormones that play pivotal roles in the control of two vital and closely related systems, the metabolic and the circulatory systems, respectively. A failure in the proper action of each of these hormones results, to a variable degree, in the development of two highly prevalent and commonly overlapping diseases - diabetes mellitus and hypertension. In recent years, a series of studies has revealed a tight connection between the signal transduction pathways that mediate insulin and angiotensin II actions in target tissues. This molecular cross-talk occurs at multiple levels and plays an important role in phenomena that range from the action of anti-hypertensive drugs to cardiac hypertrophy and energy acquisition by the heart. At the extracellular level, the angiotensin-converting enzyme controls angiotensin II synthesis but also interferes with insulin signaling through the proper regulation of angiotensin II and through the accumulation of bradykinin. At an early intracellular level, angiotensin II, acting through JAK-2/IRS-1/PI3-kinase, JNK and ERK, may induce the serine phosphorylation and inhibition of key elements of the insulin-signaling pathway. Finally, by inducing the expression of the regulatory protein SOCS-3, angiotensin II may impose a late control on the insulin signal. This review will focus on the main advances obtained in this field and will discuss the implications of this molecular cross-talk in the common clinical association between diabetes mellitus and hypertension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)98-107
Number of pages10
JournalDiabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2006

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Angiotensin II
Insulin
Medical problems
Diabetes Mellitus
Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling Proteins
Hormones
Hypertension
Signal transduction
Phosphorylation
Cardiomegaly
Bradykinin
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A
Cardiovascular System
Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases
Serine
Antihypertensive Agents
Signal Transduction
Association reactions
Tissue

Keywords

  • Cardiac hypertrophy
  • Hypertension
  • Insulin resistance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

The multi-faceted cross-talk between the insulin and angiotensin II signaling systems. / Velloso, Licio A.; Folli, Franco; Perego, Lucia; Saad, Mario J A.

In: Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews, Vol. 22, No. 2, 03.2006, p. 98-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Velloso, Licio A. ; Folli, Franco ; Perego, Lucia ; Saad, Mario J A. / The multi-faceted cross-talk between the insulin and angiotensin II signaling systems. In: Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews. 2006 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 98-107.
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