The Management of Schizophrenia in Clinical Practice (MOSAIC) Registry: A focus on patients, caregivers, illness severity, functional status, disease burden and healthcare utilization

Henry A. Nasrallah, Philip D. Harvey, Daniel Casey, Csilla T. Csoboth, James I. Hudson, Laura Julian, Ellen Lentz, Keith H. Nuechterlein, Diana O. Perkins, Nirali Kotowsky, Tracey G. Skale, Lonnie R. Snowden, Rajiv Tandon, Cenk Tek, Dawn Velligan, Sophia Vinogradov, Cedric O'Gorman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The Management of Schizophrenia in Clinical Practice (MOSAIC), a disease-based registry of schizophrenia, was initiated in December 2012 to address important gaps in our understanding of the impact and burden of schizophrenia and to provide insight into the current status of schizophrenia care in the US. Recruitment began in December 2012 with ongoing assessment continuing through May 2014. Methods: Participants were recruited from a network of 15 centralized Patient Assessment Centers supporting proximal care sites. Broad entry criteria included patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizophreniform or schizoaffective disorder, presenting within the normal course of care, in usual treatment settings, aged ≥. 18. years and able to read and speak English. Results: By May 2014, 550 participants (65.8% male, 59.8% White, 64.4% single, mean age 42.9. years), were enrolled. The majority had a diagnosis of schizophrenia (62.0%). Mean illness duration at entry was 15.0. years. Common comorbidities at entry were high lipid levels (26.9%), hypertension (23.1%) and type II diabetes (13%). Participants were categorized by baseline overall Clinical Global Impression-Schizophrenia Severity Score as minimally (9.1%), mildly (25.3%), moderately (39.9%), markedly (22.3%) and severely (3.4%) ill. Most commonly used second generation antipsychotics at entry were risperidone (17.8%), clozapine (16.5%), olanzapine (14.0%), aripiprazole (13.6%) and quetiapine (5.6%). Conclusions: No large-scale patient registry has been conducted in the US to longitudinally follow patients with schizophrenia and describe symptom attributes, support network, care access and disease burden. These data provide important epidemiological, clinical and outcome insights into the burden of schizophrenia in the US.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-79
Number of pages11
JournalSchizophrenia research
Volume166
Issue number1-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 5 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Disease burden
  • Disease characteristics
  • Functioning
  • Registry
  • Schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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    Nasrallah, H. A., Harvey, P. D., Casey, D., Csoboth, C. T., Hudson, J. I., Julian, L., Lentz, E., Nuechterlein, K. H., Perkins, D. O., Kotowsky, N., Skale, T. G., Snowden, L. R., Tandon, R., Tek, C., Velligan, D., Vinogradov, S., & O'Gorman, C. (2015). The Management of Schizophrenia in Clinical Practice (MOSAIC) Registry: A focus on patients, caregivers, illness severity, functional status, disease burden and healthcare utilization. Schizophrenia research, 166(1-3), 69-79. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2015.04.031