The impact of in-house attending surgeon supervision on the rates of preventable and potentially preventable complications and death at the start of the new academic year

Kenji Inaba, Adam Hauch, Bernardino C. Branco, Stephen Cohn, Pedro G R Teixeira, Gustavo Recinos, Galinos Barmparas, Demetrios Demetriades

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1134-1139
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume79
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Mortality
Los Angeles
Trauma Centers
Surgeons
Morbidity
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Inaba, K., Hauch, A., Branco, B. C., Cohn, S., Teixeira, P. G. R., Recinos, G., ... Demetriades, D. (2013). The impact of in-house attending surgeon supervision on the rates of preventable and potentially preventable complications and death at the start of the new academic year. American Surgeon, 79(11), 1134-1139.

The impact of in-house attending surgeon supervision on the rates of preventable and potentially preventable complications and death at the start of the new academic year. / Inaba, Kenji; Hauch, Adam; Branco, Bernardino C.; Cohn, Stephen; Teixeira, Pedro G R; Recinos, Gustavo; Barmparas, Galinos; Demetriades, Demetrios.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 79, No. 11, 11.2013, p. 1134-1139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Inaba, K, Hauch, A, Branco, BC, Cohn, S, Teixeira, PGR, Recinos, G, Barmparas, G & Demetriades, D 2013, 'The impact of in-house attending surgeon supervision on the rates of preventable and potentially preventable complications and death at the start of the new academic year', American Surgeon, vol. 79, no. 11, pp. 1134-1139.
Inaba, Kenji ; Hauch, Adam ; Branco, Bernardino C. ; Cohn, Stephen ; Teixeira, Pedro G R ; Recinos, Gustavo ; Barmparas, Galinos ; Demetriades, Demetrios. / The impact of in-house attending surgeon supervision on the rates of preventable and potentially preventable complications and death at the start of the new academic year. In: American Surgeon. 2013 ; Vol. 79, No. 11. pp. 1134-1139.
@article{e49ccff5d6bc40fa8628bb25bab7ac56,
title = "The impact of in-house attending surgeon supervision on the rates of preventable and potentially preventable complications and death at the start of the new academic year",
abstract = "The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of in-house attending surgeon supervision on the rate of preventable deaths (PD) and complications (PC) at the beginning of the academic year. All trauma patients admitted to the Los Angeles County + University of Southern California Medical Center over an 8-year period ending in December 2009 were reviewed. Morbidity and mortality reports were used to extract all PD/PC. Patients admitted in the first 2 months (July/ August) of the academic year were compared with those admitted at the end of the year (May/June) for two distinct time periods: 2002 to 2006 (before in-house attending surgeon supervision) and 2007 to 2009 (after 24-hour/day in-house attending surgeon supervision). During 2002 to 2006, patients admitted at the beginning of the year had significantly higher rates of PC (1.1{\%} for July/ August vs 0.6{\%} for May/June; adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.9; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.1 to 3.2; P<0.001). There was no significant difference in mortality (6.5{\%} for July/August vs 4.6{\%} for May/ June; adjusted OR, 1.1; 95{\%} CI,0.8 to 1.5; P = 0.179). During 2007 to 2009, after institution of 24- hour/day in-house attending surgeon supervision of fellows and housestaff, there was no significant difference in the rates of PC (0.7{\%} for July/August vs 0.6{\%} for May/June; OR, 1.1; 95{\%} CI, 0.8 to 1.3; P = 0.870) or PD (4.6{\%} for July/August vs 3.7{\%} for May/June; OR, 1.3; 95{\%} CI, 0.9 to 1.7; P = 0.250) seen at the beginning of the academic year. At an academic Level I trauma center, the institution of 24-hour/day in-house attending surgeon supervision significantly reduced the spike of preventable complications previously seen at the beginning of the academic year. Copyright Southeastern Surgical Congress. All rights reserved.",
author = "Kenji Inaba and Adam Hauch and Branco, {Bernardino C.} and Stephen Cohn and Teixeira, {Pedro G R} and Gustavo Recinos and Galinos Barmparas and Demetrios Demetriades",
year = "2013",
month = "11",
language = "English",
volume = "79",
pages = "1134--1139",
journal = "American Surgeon",
issn = "0003-1348",
publisher = "Southeastern Surgical Congress",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The impact of in-house attending surgeon supervision on the rates of preventable and potentially preventable complications and death at the start of the new academic year

AU - Inaba, Kenji

AU - Hauch, Adam

AU - Branco, Bernardino C.

AU - Cohn, Stephen

AU - Teixeira, Pedro G R

AU - Recinos, Gustavo

AU - Barmparas, Galinos

AU - Demetriades, Demetrios

PY - 2013/11

Y1 - 2013/11

N2 - The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of in-house attending surgeon supervision on the rate of preventable deaths (PD) and complications (PC) at the beginning of the academic year. All trauma patients admitted to the Los Angeles County + University of Southern California Medical Center over an 8-year period ending in December 2009 were reviewed. Morbidity and mortality reports were used to extract all PD/PC. Patients admitted in the first 2 months (July/ August) of the academic year were compared with those admitted at the end of the year (May/June) for two distinct time periods: 2002 to 2006 (before in-house attending surgeon supervision) and 2007 to 2009 (after 24-hour/day in-house attending surgeon supervision). During 2002 to 2006, patients admitted at the beginning of the year had significantly higher rates of PC (1.1% for July/ August vs 0.6% for May/June; adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1 to 3.2; P<0.001). There was no significant difference in mortality (6.5% for July/August vs 4.6% for May/ June; adjusted OR, 1.1; 95% CI,0.8 to 1.5; P = 0.179). During 2007 to 2009, after institution of 24- hour/day in-house attending surgeon supervision of fellows and housestaff, there was no significant difference in the rates of PC (0.7% for July/August vs 0.6% for May/June; OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.8 to 1.3; P = 0.870) or PD (4.6% for July/August vs 3.7% for May/June; OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.9 to 1.7; P = 0.250) seen at the beginning of the academic year. At an academic Level I trauma center, the institution of 24-hour/day in-house attending surgeon supervision significantly reduced the spike of preventable complications previously seen at the beginning of the academic year. Copyright Southeastern Surgical Congress. All rights reserved.

AB - The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of in-house attending surgeon supervision on the rate of preventable deaths (PD) and complications (PC) at the beginning of the academic year. All trauma patients admitted to the Los Angeles County + University of Southern California Medical Center over an 8-year period ending in December 2009 were reviewed. Morbidity and mortality reports were used to extract all PD/PC. Patients admitted in the first 2 months (July/ August) of the academic year were compared with those admitted at the end of the year (May/June) for two distinct time periods: 2002 to 2006 (before in-house attending surgeon supervision) and 2007 to 2009 (after 24-hour/day in-house attending surgeon supervision). During 2002 to 2006, patients admitted at the beginning of the year had significantly higher rates of PC (1.1% for July/ August vs 0.6% for May/June; adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1 to 3.2; P<0.001). There was no significant difference in mortality (6.5% for July/August vs 4.6% for May/ June; adjusted OR, 1.1; 95% CI,0.8 to 1.5; P = 0.179). During 2007 to 2009, after institution of 24- hour/day in-house attending surgeon supervision of fellows and housestaff, there was no significant difference in the rates of PC (0.7% for July/August vs 0.6% for May/June; OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.8 to 1.3; P = 0.870) or PD (4.6% for July/August vs 3.7% for May/June; OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.9 to 1.7; P = 0.250) seen at the beginning of the academic year. At an academic Level I trauma center, the institution of 24-hour/day in-house attending surgeon supervision significantly reduced the spike of preventable complications previously seen at the beginning of the academic year. Copyright Southeastern Surgical Congress. All rights reserved.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84886708507&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84886708507&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 24165245

AN - SCOPUS:84886708507

VL - 79

SP - 1134

EP - 1139

JO - American Surgeon

JF - American Surgeon

SN - 0003-1348

IS - 11

ER -