The impact of exposure, relaxation, and rescripting therapy for post-trauma nightmares on suicidal ideation

Chelsea M. Cogan, Jenny Y. Lee, Christopher C. Cranston, Kristi E. Pruiksma, Jamie L. Rhudy, Joanne L. Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: This study investigated whether a brief psychotherapy for post-trauma nightmares (exposure, relaxation, and rescripting therapy [ERRT]), reduced suicidal ideation (SI). We hypothesized that: (a) nightmare frequency and severity, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and sleep quality would be related to SI at pretreatment; (b) SI would decrease from pre- to post-treatment; and (c) the decrease in SI would remain after controlling for change in PTSD and depression. Method: Seventy-five individuals exposed to a traumatic event and who experienced frequent nightmares (minimum one per week) participated in ERRT. Participants were not required to have a psychological diagnosis. Thirty percent endorsed SI at pretreatment. Results: Depression and PTSD were related to SI at pretreatment. SI decreased following treatment; however, the third hypothesis was not supported. Conclusion: Results suggest brief psychotherapy targeting post-trauma nightmares may decrease SI. More research is necessary to determine what factors contribute to decreases in SI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2095-2105
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology
Volume75
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

Keywords

  • PTSD
  • nightmares
  • psychotherapy
  • sleep disturbance
  • suicidal ideation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology

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