The evolution of avian senescence patterns: implications for understanding primary aging processes

D. J. Holmes, S. N. Austad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The comparative longevity of birds and other flying homeotherms is consistent with evolutionary senescence theory, which posits that species with low mortality rates from predation or accident will be released from selection for rapid maturity and early reproduction, and will exhibit retarded aging. Comparative analyses of avian life history parameters to date broadly support an association between low mortality rates, slow reproduction, and long lifespan. The diversity of bird life histories suggests the importance of developing a diversity of avian models for studies of aging mechanisms, both proximate and ultimate, and for using wild as well as domestic representatives. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)307-317
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Zoologist
Volume35
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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senescence
life history
bird
mortality
birds
accidents
accident
flight
predation
parameter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

The evolution of avian senescence patterns : implications for understanding primary aging processes. / Holmes, D. J.; Austad, S. N.

In: American Zoologist, Vol. 35, No. 4, 1995, p. 307-317.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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