"The effects of web-prolonged exposure among military personnel and veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder": Correction

STRONG STAR Consortium

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Reports an error in "The effects of web-prolonged exposure among military personnel and veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder" by Carmen P. McLean, Edna B. Foa, Katherine A. Dondanville, Christopher K. Haddock, Madeleine L. Miller, Sheila A. M. Rauch, Jeffery S. Yarvis, Edward C. Wright, Brittany N. Hall-Clark, Brooke A. Fina, Brett T. Litz, Jim Mintz, Stacey Young-McCaughan and Alan L. Peterson (Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 2021[Sep], Vol 13[6], 621-631). In the original article, "for the STRONG STAR Consortium" was missing from the end of the author line. In addition, the numbering and text of the affiliations for Edward C. Wright, Brittany N. Hall-Clark, Brooke A. Fina, Brett T. Litz, Jim Mintz, Stacey Young-McCaughan, and Alan L. Peterson were incorrect because of duplicated affiliation details and associated typographical errors. Finally, in the References, "for the STRONG STAR Consortium" and "on behalf of the STRONG STAR Consortium" were missing from the ends of the author lists for Foa et al. (2018) and Resick et al. (2015), respectively. The online version of this article has been corrected. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2020-86687-001). OBJECTIVE: Web-based treatments address many of the logistical and stigma-related barriers to in-person behavioral health care. Prior studies of web-based treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) did not employ gold-standard treatments and have not compared to in-person therapy. METHOD: We compared a web version of Prolonged Exposure Therapy, "Web-PE," to in-person Present-Centered Therapy (PCT) in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) with 40 military personnel with PTSD seeking treatment at Fort Hood, Texas. Due to recruitment challenges, we terminated the RCT and subsequently examined the effects of Web-PE in an uncontrolled open trial with 34 service members and veterans recruited nationwide. Both studies assessed PTSD, depressive symptoms, and health functioning at baseline and 1 and 3 months posttreatment; the RCT also included a 6-month assessment. RESULTS: Results of the RCT showed no differential impact for Web-PE and PCT, although more PCT participants achieved clinically significant change at one of the follow-up assessments. Both treatment conditions significantly reduced self-reported and blind independent interviewer-assessed symptoms of PTSD. Results of the open trial showed that Web-PE was associated with significant reductions in self-reported PTSD symptoms, with a much larger effect size than in the RCT. CONCLUSIONS: Web-PE significantly reduced PTSD symptoms in both studies, although the reductions in PTSD symptoms were greater among open trial participants, who were specifically seeking a web-based treatment. Future research should evaluate Web-PE relative to another web-based treatment. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)804
Number of pages1
JournalPsychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of '"The effects of web-prolonged exposure among military personnel and veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder": Correction'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this