The effects of perturbed cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular reactivity on structural MRI and behavioral readouts in mild traumatic brain injury

Justin A. Long, Lora T. Watts, Wei Li, Qiang Shen, Eric R. Muir, Shiliang Huang, Robert C. Boggs, Abhinav Suri, Timothy Q. Duong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of perturbed cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebrovascular reactivity (CR) on relaxation time constant (T 2), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA), and behavioral scores at 1 and 3 hours, 2, 7, and 14 days after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats. Open-skull TBI was induced over the left primary forelimb somatosensory cortex (N=8 and 3 sham). We found the abnormal areas of CBF and CR on days 0 and 2 were larger than those of the T 2, ADC, and FA abnormalities. In the impact core, CBF was reduced on day 0, increased to 2.5 times of normal on day 2, and returned toward normal by day 14, whereas in the tissue surrounding the impact, hypoperfusion was observed on days 0 and 2. CR in the impact core was negative, most severe on day 2 but gradually returned toward normal. T 2, ADC, and FA abnormalities in the impact core were detected on day 0, peaked on day 2, and pseudonormalized by day 14. Lesion volumes peaked on day 2 and were temporally correlated with forelimb asymmetry and foot-fault scores. This study quantified the effects of perturbed CBF and CR on structural magnetic resonance imaging and behavioral readouts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1852-1861
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
Volume35
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

Keywords

  • MRI: diffusion tensor imaging
  • TBI
  • functional outcomes
  • hypercapnia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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