The effects of food restriction in man on hepatic metabolism of acetaminophen

S. Schenker, Kermit V Speeg, A. Perez, J. Finch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Recent reports have suggested that food deprivation may contribute to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by shunting drug detoxification from the conjugative to the potentially toxic oxidative pathways. Methods: This study assessed this concept in a prospective study of food restriction of 500 calories/day over 5 days and also of 1000 calories/day over 13 days. Obese, otherwise normal, individuals received 2 g acetaminophen orally at the start and again after food restriction. Sequential liver tests, as well as serum and urine acetaminophen and its derivatives were measured. Results: In both food-restricted groups there was no evidence of any change in the elimination or in the metabolic pattern of acetaminophen removal. Liver tests remained normal. The average weight loss was about 6 pounds. Conclusions: Our data, with this brief, but major degree of food restriction, and this load of acetaminophen (half-maximal daily dose), do not demonstrate an effect of caloric restriction on acetaminophen disposition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)145-150
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Nutrition
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Acetaminophen
Food
Liver
Food Deprivation
Caloric Restriction
Poisons
Weight Loss
Urine
Prospective Studies
Serum
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Acetaminophen metabolism
  • Food restriction
  • Liver injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Gastroenterology
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The effects of food restriction in man on hepatic metabolism of acetaminophen. / Schenker, S.; Speeg, Kermit V; Perez, A.; Finch, J.

In: Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 20, No. 2, 2001, p. 145-150.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schenker, S. ; Speeg, Kermit V ; Perez, A. ; Finch, J. / The effects of food restriction in man on hepatic metabolism of acetaminophen. In: Clinical Nutrition. 2001 ; Vol. 20, No. 2. pp. 145-150.
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