The effects of chronic haloperidol administration on GABA receptor binding

Ronald D. Huffman, Maharaj K. Ticku

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effect of chronic administration of haloperidol for 30 days and its subsequent withdrawal for 0,4 and 8 days on the binding of [3H]-GABA and [3H]-muscimol to GABA binding sites in rat brain membranes obtained from six discrete regions of the brain and spinal cord was investigated. The chronic administration of haloperidol resulted in a marked increase in the number of GABA binding sites within the substantia nigra, but did not affect GABA binding sites in other regions of rat brain or spinal cord. The increase in GABA binding sites in the substantia nigra was evident for at least 4 days following termination of haloperidol treatment; however, 8 days following withdrawal from haloperidol, when dopaminergic supersensitivity had become maximally expressed, the number of GABA binding sites in the substantia nigra had declined and was the same as that observed in the control rats. These observations suggest that blockade of dopamine receptors in the striatum by haloperidol results in a compensatory decrease in the activity of the GABAergic strionigral system that leads to an increase in the number of GABA binding sites within the substantia nigra. This increase in the number of GABA binding sites is gradually reversed when dopamine is again allowed to interact with its receptors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-204
Number of pages6
JournalPharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1983

Keywords

  • Apomorphine-induced stereotypies
  • Dopaminergic supersensitivity
  • GABA receptor binding
  • Haloperidol
  • Muscimol
  • Substantia nigra

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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