The effectiveness of polyethylene versus titanium particles in inducing osteolysis in vivo

Marius von Knoch, Donna E. Jewison, Jean D. Sibonga, Christoph Sprecher, Bernard F. Morrey, Franz Loer, Daniel J. Berry, Sean P. Scully

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

92 Scopus citations

Abstract

Bearing surface wear and periprosthetic osteolysis due to wear particles are among the most common reasons for joint replacement failure. A murine calvarial model of wear particle-induced osteolysis has been used to identify different biologic factors associated with this problem and to test nonsurgical methods of modulating the host response to particulate debris. This model has utilized titanium particles, however, in clinical practice the most common source of particulate debris is polyethylene particles from bearing surface wear. We now report a calvarial model of wear particle-induced osteolysis based on commercially available polyethylene particles. We found that compared to sham surgery osteoclast recruitment and bone resorption can be induced by introduction of the titanium particles or polyethylene particles. However, bone resorption was significantly higher with polyethylene particles compared to titanium particles (p=0.02).We consider the polyethylene based murine calvarial model of wear particle-induced osteolysis a reliable and clinically relevant tool to understand the host factors and potential pharmacologic interventions that can influence wear debris generated osteolysis. This model might serve as an extension of the well-established titanium based bone resorption model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)237-243
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic Research
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Calvarium
  • Osteolysis
  • Particle
  • Polyethylene
  • Titanium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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