The effect of meclofenamate on renal blood flow in the unanesthetized dog: Relation to renal prostaglandins and sodium balance

M. C. Blasingham, R. E. Shade, L. Share, A. Nasjletti

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    15 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    We compared the effects of sodium meclofenamate (5 mg/kg i.v.), an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis, on renal function in six unanesthetized dogs maintained for 5 to 7 days before the experiment on 100 mEq/day of NaCl and after sodium depletion by furosemide administration and salt deprivation. Plasma renin activity (PRA) during sodium depletion (12.35 ± 3.93 ng ml-1 hr-1) was higher than during sodium repletion (1.46 ± 0.47 ng ml-1 hr-1; P<.05). The administration of meclofenamate did not alter mean arterial pressure, renal blood flow, urine volume, excretion of sodium and potassium or PRA in the sodium replete dog. However, during sodium depletion meclofenamate reduced renal blood flow from 168 ± 35 to 105 ± 23 ml/min (P<.01) and urine flow from 0.32 ± 0.09 to 0.16 ± 0.05 ml/min (P<.05) but did not affect mean arterial pressure, electrolyte excretion or PRA. The meclofenamate-induced reduction in renal blood flow during sodium depletion was well correlated with control PRA. After administration of meclofenamate, the urinary excretion of immunoreactive prostaglandin E2 fell by 66% (P<.05) in the sodium replete dog and by 72% (P<.05) in the sodium depleted dog. This study demonstrates that the effects of meclofenamate on renal hemodynamics vary with the state of sodium balance and in relation to PRA.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1-4
    Number of pages4
    JournalJournal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
    Volume214
    Issue number1
    StatePublished - Jan 1 1980

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Molecular Medicine
    • Pharmacology

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