The Effect of Low-Dose Aspirin on Frailty Phenotype and Frailty Index in Community-Dwelling Older Adults in the ASPirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly Study

Sara E. Espinoza, Robyn L. Woods, A. R.M.Saifuddin Ekram, Michael E. Ernst, Galina Polekhina, Rory Wolfe, Raj C. Shah, Stephanie A. Ward, Elsdon Storey, Mark R. Nelson, Christopher M. Reid, Jessica E. Lockery, Suzanne G. Orchard, Ruth Trevaks, Sharyn M. Fitzgerald, Nigel P. Stocks, Andy Chan, John J. McNeil, Anne M. Murray, Anne B. NewmanJoanne Ryan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Frailty is associated with chronic inflammation, which may be modified by aspirin. The purpose of this study was to determine whether low-dose aspirin reduces incident frailty in healthy older adult participants of the ASPirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly (ASPREE) trial. METHODS: In the United States and Australia, 19 114 community-dwelling individuals aged ≥70 and older (U.S. minorities ≥65 years) and free of overt cardiovascular disease, persistent physical disability, and dementia were enrolled in ASPREE, a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 100-mg daily aspirin versus placebo. Frailty, a prespecified study end point, was defined according to a modified Fried frailty definition (Fried frailty) and the frailty index based on the deficit accumulation model (frailty index). Competing risk Cox proportional hazard models were used to compare time to incident frailty by aspirin versus placebo. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to include frailty data with and without imputation of missing data. RESULTS: Over a median 4.7 years, 2 252 participants developed incident Fried frailty, and 4 451 had incident frailty according to the frailty index. Compared with placebo, aspirin treatment did not alter the risk of incident frailty (Fried frailty hazard ratio [HR]: 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.96-1.13; frailty index HR: 1.03, 95% CI 0.97-1.09). The proportion of individuals classified as frail, and the trajectory in continuous frailty scores over time, were not different between the aspirin and placebo treatment groups. The results were consistent across a series of subgroups. CONCLUSIONS: Low-dose aspirin use in healthy older adults when initiated in older ages does not reduce risk of incident frailty or the trajectory of frailty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2007-2014
Number of pages8
JournalThe journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences
Volume77
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 6 2022

Keywords

  • Aspirin
  • Clinical trials
  • Frailty
  • Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The Effect of Low-Dose Aspirin on Frailty Phenotype and Frailty Index in Community-Dwelling Older Adults in the ASPirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this