The common marmoset monkey: Avenues for exploring the prenatal, placental, and postnatal mechanisms in developmental programming of pediatric obesity

Laren Riesche, Suzette D. Tardif, Corinna N. Ross, Victoria A. Demartelly, Toni Ziegler, Julienne N. Rutherford

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Animal models have been critical in building evidence that the prenatal experience and intrauterine environment are capable of exerting profound and permanent effects on metabolic health through developmental programming of obesity. However, despite physiological and evolutionary similarities, nonhuman primate models are relatively rare. The common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) is a New World monkey that has been used as a biomedical model for well more than 50 years and has recently been framed as an appropriate model for exploring early-life impacts on later health and disease. The spontaneous, multifactorial, and early-life development of obesity in the common marmoset make it a valuable research model for advancing our knowledge about the role of the prenatal and placental mechanisms involved in developmental programming of obesity. This paper provides a brief overview of obesity in the common marmoset, followed by a discussion of marmoset reproduction and placental characteristics. We then discuss the occurrence and utility of variable intrauterine environments in developmental programming in marmosets. Evidence of developmental programming of obesity will be given, and finally, we put forward future directions and innovations for including the placenta in developmental programming of obesity in the common marmoset.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)R684-R692
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume314
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The common marmoset monkey: Avenues for exploring the prenatal, placental, and postnatal mechanisms in developmental programming of pediatric obesity'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this