The chronic neuropsychiatric sequelae of COVID-19: The need for a prospective study of viral impact on brain functioning

the CNS SARS-CoV-2 Consortium

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: The increasing evidence of SARS-CoV-2 impact on the central nervous system (CNS) raises key questions on its impact for risk of later life cognitive decline, Alzheimer's disease (AD), and other dementia. Methods: The Alzheimer's Association and representatives from more than 30 countries—with technical guidance from the World Health Organization—have formed an international consortium to study the short-and long-term consequences of SARS-CoV-2 on the CNS—including the underlying biology that may contribute to AD and other dementias. This consortium will link teams from around the world covering more than 22 million COVID-19 cases to enroll two groups of individuals including people with disease, to be evaluated for follow-up evaluations at 6, 9, and 18 months, and people who are already enrolled in existing international research studies to add additional measures and markers of their underlying biology. Conclusions: The increasing evidence and understanding of SARS-CoV-2's impact on the CNS raises key questions on the impact for risk of later life cognitive decline, AD, and other dementia. This program of studies aims to better understand the long-term consequences that may impact the brain, cognition, and functioning—including the underlying biology that may contribute to AD and other dementias.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • cognitive decline
  • neuropsychiatry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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