The ability of the stress process model to explain mental health outcomes

David A Katerndahl, Michael Parchman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

No theory adequately explicates the relationships between stress, social support, and health. The recently developed Stress Process Model incorporates multiple levels of support and stress at the individual, family, and community level, with a focus on predicting mental health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to use an existing database to assess the predictive value of the Stress Process Model in explaining mental health outcomes in community-dwelling subjects with and without panic attacks. This study is a secondary analysis using data obtained in 1990 through 1991 for the Panic Attack Care-Seeking Threshold (PACT) study. Subjects who agreed to participate completed an in-depth interview concerning demographic features, panic characteristics, chronic medical problems, family characteristics, illness attitudes and behaviors, coping strategies, symptom perceptions, psychiatric morbidity, health care utilization, and functional status. The utility of the Stress Process Model is supported by three lines of reasoning. First, most of the relationships predicted by the model were documented in this study. Second, the model accounted for significant amounts of variance in moderating factors, primary and secondary stressors, and mental health outcomes. Finally, two of the three hypotheses were supported by this study. The integration of family and neighborhood variables into the stress process should be attractive to mental health workers in primary care and community settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-360
Number of pages10
JournalComprehensive Psychiatry
Volume43
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2002

Fingerprint

Aptitude
Mental Health
Panic Disorder
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Illness Behavior
Independent Living
Panic
Social Support
Psychiatry
Primary Health Care
Demography
Databases
Interviews
Morbidity
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

The ability of the stress process model to explain mental health outcomes. / Katerndahl, David A; Parchman, Michael.

In: Comprehensive Psychiatry, Vol. 43, No. 5, 09.2002, p. 351-360.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{501e17753adb461e99cb47be3ad5b1bb,
title = "The ability of the stress process model to explain mental health outcomes",
abstract = "No theory adequately explicates the relationships between stress, social support, and health. The recently developed Stress Process Model incorporates multiple levels of support and stress at the individual, family, and community level, with a focus on predicting mental health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to use an existing database to assess the predictive value of the Stress Process Model in explaining mental health outcomes in community-dwelling subjects with and without panic attacks. This study is a secondary analysis using data obtained in 1990 through 1991 for the Panic Attack Care-Seeking Threshold (PACT) study. Subjects who agreed to participate completed an in-depth interview concerning demographic features, panic characteristics, chronic medical problems, family characteristics, illness attitudes and behaviors, coping strategies, symptom perceptions, psychiatric morbidity, health care utilization, and functional status. The utility of the Stress Process Model is supported by three lines of reasoning. First, most of the relationships predicted by the model were documented in this study. Second, the model accounted for significant amounts of variance in moderating factors, primary and secondary stressors, and mental health outcomes. Finally, two of the three hypotheses were supported by this study. The integration of family and neighborhood variables into the stress process should be attractive to mental health workers in primary care and community settings.",
author = "Katerndahl, {David A} and Michael Parchman",
year = "2002",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1053/comp.2002.34626",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "43",
pages = "351--360",
journal = "Comprehensive Psychiatry",
issn = "0010-440X",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The ability of the stress process model to explain mental health outcomes

AU - Katerndahl, David A

AU - Parchman, Michael

PY - 2002/9

Y1 - 2002/9

N2 - No theory adequately explicates the relationships between stress, social support, and health. The recently developed Stress Process Model incorporates multiple levels of support and stress at the individual, family, and community level, with a focus on predicting mental health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to use an existing database to assess the predictive value of the Stress Process Model in explaining mental health outcomes in community-dwelling subjects with and without panic attacks. This study is a secondary analysis using data obtained in 1990 through 1991 for the Panic Attack Care-Seeking Threshold (PACT) study. Subjects who agreed to participate completed an in-depth interview concerning demographic features, panic characteristics, chronic medical problems, family characteristics, illness attitudes and behaviors, coping strategies, symptom perceptions, psychiatric morbidity, health care utilization, and functional status. The utility of the Stress Process Model is supported by three lines of reasoning. First, most of the relationships predicted by the model were documented in this study. Second, the model accounted for significant amounts of variance in moderating factors, primary and secondary stressors, and mental health outcomes. Finally, two of the three hypotheses were supported by this study. The integration of family and neighborhood variables into the stress process should be attractive to mental health workers in primary care and community settings.

AB - No theory adequately explicates the relationships between stress, social support, and health. The recently developed Stress Process Model incorporates multiple levels of support and stress at the individual, family, and community level, with a focus on predicting mental health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to use an existing database to assess the predictive value of the Stress Process Model in explaining mental health outcomes in community-dwelling subjects with and without panic attacks. This study is a secondary analysis using data obtained in 1990 through 1991 for the Panic Attack Care-Seeking Threshold (PACT) study. Subjects who agreed to participate completed an in-depth interview concerning demographic features, panic characteristics, chronic medical problems, family characteristics, illness attitudes and behaviors, coping strategies, symptom perceptions, psychiatric morbidity, health care utilization, and functional status. The utility of the Stress Process Model is supported by three lines of reasoning. First, most of the relationships predicted by the model were documented in this study. Second, the model accounted for significant amounts of variance in moderating factors, primary and secondary stressors, and mental health outcomes. Finally, two of the three hypotheses were supported by this study. The integration of family and neighborhood variables into the stress process should be attractive to mental health workers in primary care and community settings.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036731877&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036731877&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1053/comp.2002.34626

DO - 10.1053/comp.2002.34626

M3 - Article

C2 - 12216010

AN - SCOPUS:0036731877

VL - 43

SP - 351

EP - 360

JO - Comprehensive Psychiatry

JF - Comprehensive Psychiatry

SN - 0010-440X

IS - 5

ER -