Systolic and diastolic blood pressures as predictors of coronary heart disease mortality in the Whitehall study

M. J. Lichtenstein, M. J. Shipley, G. Rose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

80 Scopus citations

Abstract

Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were compared as predictors of death due to coronary heart disease using data on the 10 year mortality outcome from the 18 403 male civil servants, aged 40–64, in the Whitehall study. There were 727 deaths due to coronary heart disease. At entry to the study the systolic pressure in these men was significantly higher than the diastolic pressure, and a standardised index of relative risk for death from coronary heart disease was greater for systolic blood pressure. After adjustment for age the top quintile of systolic pressure ( 151 mm Hg) identified 5% more men at risk of death from coronary heart disease than for the top diastolic quintile (95 mm Hg). The findings suggested that clinicians should pay more attention to systolic levels as a criterion for making diagnostic and therapeutic decisions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)243-255
Number of pages13
JournalBritish Medical Journal (Clinical research ed.)
Volume291
Issue number6490
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 27 1985
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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