Symptoms as a clue to otologic and psychiatric diagnosis in patients with dizziness

Michael R. Clark, Mark D. Sullivan, Mark Fischl, Wayne J. Katon, Joan E. Russo, Robert A Dobie, Richard Voorhees

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dizziness is a common symptom that often remains unexplained despite extensive medical evaluation. Psychiatric disorders are usually considered only after all medical causes of dizziness have been ruled out. Sixty-five patients referred to an otolaryngology practice received a structured psychiatric interview, an otologic evaluation, and a dizziness questionnaire modified to assess psychiatric symptoms. They were divided into four diagnostic groups: psychiatric diagnosis only, otologic diagnosis only, both diagnoses, or neither diagnosis. Eleven questionnaire items were significantly associated with diagnostic groupings. Stepwise discriminant function analysis utilizing age, gender, rapid/irregular heartbeat, extremety weakness, nausea/vomiting, and difficulty with speech resulted in correct group classification for 70% of subjects. The presence of dizziness symptoms like vertigo or lightheadedness was not significantly different between groups. This study suggests that assessment of psychiatric and autonomic symptoms should accompany, not follow, otologic evaluation of dizziness. These symptoms may be more important diagnostically than dizziness quality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)461-470
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Psychosomatic Research
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dizziness
Mental Disorders
Psychiatry
Vertigo
Otolaryngology
Discriminant Analysis
Nausea
Vomiting
Interviews

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Dizziness
  • Psychiatric Diagnosis
  • Somatization
  • Vertigo

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Clark, M. R., Sullivan, M. D., Fischl, M., Katon, W. J., Russo, J. E., Dobie, R. A., & Voorhees, R. (1994). Symptoms as a clue to otologic and psychiatric diagnosis in patients with dizziness. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 38(5), 461-470. https://doi.org/10.1016/0022-3999(94)90107-4

Symptoms as a clue to otologic and psychiatric diagnosis in patients with dizziness. / Clark, Michael R.; Sullivan, Mark D.; Fischl, Mark; Katon, Wayne J.; Russo, Joan E.; Dobie, Robert A; Voorhees, Richard.

In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, Vol. 38, No. 5, 1994, p. 461-470.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Clark, MR, Sullivan, MD, Fischl, M, Katon, WJ, Russo, JE, Dobie, RA & Voorhees, R 1994, 'Symptoms as a clue to otologic and psychiatric diagnosis in patients with dizziness', Journal of Psychosomatic Research, vol. 38, no. 5, pp. 461-470. https://doi.org/10.1016/0022-3999(94)90107-4
Clark, Michael R. ; Sullivan, Mark D. ; Fischl, Mark ; Katon, Wayne J. ; Russo, Joan E. ; Dobie, Robert A ; Voorhees, Richard. / Symptoms as a clue to otologic and psychiatric diagnosis in patients with dizziness. In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research. 1994 ; Vol. 38, No. 5. pp. 461-470.
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