Switching diseased cells from cytosolic aerobic glycolysis to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation: A metabolic rhythm regulated by melatonin?

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

This commentary reviews the concept of the circadian melatonin rhythm playing an essential role in reducing the development of diseases such as solid tumors which adopt cytosolic aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) to support their enhanced metabolism. Experimental data show that solid mammary tumors depend on aerobic glycolysis during the day but likely revert to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation at night for ATP production. This conversion of diseased cells during the day to a healthier phenotype at night occurs under control of the circulating melatonin rhythm. When the nocturnal melatonin rise is inhibited by light exposure at night, cancer cells function in the diseased state 24/7. The ability of melatonin to switch cancer cells as well as other diseased cells, for example, Alzheimer disease, fibrosis, hyperactivation of macrophages, etc, from aerobic glycolysis to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation may be a basic protective mechanism to reduce pathologies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere12677
JournalJournal of pineal research
Volume70
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Alzheimer disease
  • Warburg metabolism
  • cancer
  • circadian rhythm
  • fibrosis
  • mitochondria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology

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