Swallowing progression during the acute phase of cortical and subcortical ischemic stroke and its association with the extension of brain damage and cognitive impairment

Aline Mansueto Mourão, Laélia Cristina Caseiro Vicente, Mery Natali Silva Abreu, Chaves Tatiana Simões, Sant’Anna Romeu Vale, Leonardo Cruz De Souza, Antônio Lucio Teixeira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To assess swallowing progression and its association with the extension of brain damage and cognitive impairment during the acute phase of ischemic stroke. Methods: Cross-sectional, observational study with 50 patients, who were admitted to a Stroke Unit with cerebral ischemia, with a maximum stroke time of 24 h. The following clinical tools were used: National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, Mini-Mental State Examination, Frontal Battery Assessment, and the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score for neuroimaging. The Gugging Swallowing Screen and the Functional Oral Intake Scale were used to assess swallowing. The patients were assessed at three different time-points: at hospital admission, after 72 h of hospitalization, and at hospital discharge. Results: The mean age of patients was 65.5 years. The frequency of dysphagic patients was 50.0%, 18.0%, and 12.0% at admission, after 72 h of hospitalization, and at discharge, respectively. Scores on the Frontal Battery Assessment and the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score were associated with dysphagia progression. Conclusion: Dysphagia is a common complication in the acute phase of stroke, and is associated with the extension of brain damage and cognitive impairment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)523-527
Number of pages5
JournalTopics in Stroke Rehabilitation
Volume26
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 3 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • acute ischemic stroke
  • cognition
  • Dysphagia
  • swallowing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Community and Home Care
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Swallowing progression during the acute phase of cortical and subcortical ischemic stroke and its association with the extension of brain damage and cognitive impairment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this